GroupHouseNet: webstream updates on beak trimming and tail docking

COST action GroupHouseNet Stakeholder Meeting

June 27th 2018

 

Schedule (Local time in Turkey: CET +1),

Webstreamed session:

09:00-9:05      Brief introduction to the Action and meeting, Action Chair Andrew M. Janczak

09:05-9:10      Introduction from the organiser, Sezen Ozkan

09:15-9:45      Challenges and possible solutions related to damaging behaviour in laying hens, Mia Fernyhough, RSPCA

09:50-10:20    Research on risk factors and prevention of damaging behaviour in laying hens, Elske de Haas, WUR

10:20-10:45    Break

10:50-11:20    Tail biting and actions to prevent tail biting in the EU, Copa Cogeca, Miguel

Angel Higuera, Director ANPROGAPOR, Madrid

11:25-11:55    European Commission project to reduce systematic tail-docking of piglets in

Member States, Desmond Maguire, European Commission, DG Health and Food Safety

 

How to join the webstream:

  1. Primary link: Ege university digital media server: http://stream.ege.edu.tr/canli2.html. This link can only be viewed with PC/notebook with enable flash player-supported internet browser (does not support mobile phone or tablet view).
  2. Second optionIn case there are any problems, we may use this Youtube link: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCbgZZs7LslTIxC8880ppvew/live

 

Hennovation project results

When research meets farming to lift welfare (article in Poultry World, dd 12-6-2018).

The EU-funded Hennovation project was an exercise in bringing egg farmers together with researchers to develop practical ways to improve welfare, as Tony McDougal discovers.

Researchers have partnered with farmers to draw up practical new measures for improving the health and welfare of farmed poultry.
The 2 ½ year EU-funded Hennovation project, which ended this autumn, has been finding ways to introduce practice-led innovation in sustainable animal welfare through the development of innovation networks.

The core of the project was more than 15 so-called “innovation networks”, involving producers and laying-hen processors, established in 5 EU countries – the Czech Republic, Spain, Sweden, the UK and the Netherlands. They looked at a range of technical challenges including feather loss through injurious pecking, red mites and handling hens at end-of-lay.

Read more at the Poultry World website.

From beak to tail – Mechanisms underlying damaging behaviour in laying hens and pigs (Satellite workshop ISAE-2017)

August 7, 2017 a very nice one-day meeting was held in Aarhus (DK) to discuss feather pecking in laying hens and tail biting in pigs.  The meeting was a joint initiative of FareWellDock and GroupHouseNet. A Skype4business connection made it possible for about 10 external participants to join the meeting in addition to the 60 delegates present in person.

Programme:

Opening of the meeting, introduction and networking session,
Anna Valros, Sandra Edwards

9:50-11:00 Theme 1: Mechanisms underlying the link between health and damaging behaviour
Invited speakers: Janicke Nordgreen (pigs), Jerine van der Eijk (poultry)

Mini research seminar
≥ Lisette van der Zande: The estimation of genetic effects of tail damage on weaned pigs and its influence on production traits
≥ Anja Brinch Riber: Link between feather pecking and keel bone damage
≥Mirjam Holinger: Does chronic intermittent stress increase tail and ear manipulation in pigs?
≥Laura Boyle: The effect of removing antibiotics from the diets of weaner pigs on performance of ear and tail biting behaviours and associated lesions

11:00-11:20 Coffee/tea break
11:20-12:20 Theme 1 continues: Group and plenary discussion, Anna Valros
12:20-13:20 Lunch break
13:20-14:30 Theme 2: Predisposing factors for damaging behaviour during early development
Invited speakers: Jo Edgar (poultry) and Armelle Prunier (pigs)

Mini research seminar
≥Ute Knierim: A tool to work on risk factors during rearing for feather pecking in laying hens
≥Elske de Haas, Margrethe Brantsæter & Fernanda Machado Tahamtani: Disrupting availability of floor substrate in the first weeks of life influences feather pecking during rearing and lay – a Dutch and Norwegian approach
≥Anouschka Middelkoop: Effect of early feeding on the behavioural development of piglets around weaning
≥Irene Camerlink: The crooked mind of the commercial pig: can we rectify abnormal biting behaviour by early and later life conditions?

14:30-14:50 Coffee/tea break
14:50-15:50 Theme 2 continues: Group and plenary discussion, Sandra Edwards
15:50 Closing of workshop

Some tweets from the workshop:

Acute lethal aggression is increasingly seen in commercial pig farming, as is excessive neonatal aggression (Irene Camerlink)

About 50 studies link (in-)adequate foraging to injurious feather pecking in poultry (Jo Edgar).

Maternal care strongly influences chick behavioural development (Jo Edgar)

Study: Lots of ear biting on Irish pig farms, up to 50% of pigs; Follow up: Antibiotic use may play a role (both causing & treating) (Laura Boyle).

Feather pecking appears to be linked to keel bone damage (Anja Brinch Riber).

Feather pecking is associated with elevated specific immune response (Jerine van der Eijk).

Tipping bucket model of feather pecking
Tipping bucket model of feather pecking (modified after Bracke et al. 2012 model for tail biting).

Webinar: How to limit the impact of non-beaktrimming on animal welfare in parent stock

 

How to limit the impact of non-beaktrimming on animal welfare in parent stock
This Poultry World webinar delves into the possibilities to limit the impact of non-beaktrimming in parent stock. What is the best way forward with stopping the invasive procedure, without resulting in feather pecking or even cannibalism.

Find out more on June 29. Attendance is free.

Birds are ‘equipped’ by mother nature with a formidable set of weapons. With toes and especially beaks they are able to cause each other quite some harm, especially in modern animal husbandry systems. That is why beak trimming, became a standard operating procedure, with the hot blade and later via infrared treatment directly after hatch. However, with stricter legislation concerning animal welfare, alternatives to beak trimming have been under investigation.
Ingrid de Jong
Senior researcher of Wageningen University, Ingrid de Jong will share her experiences from studying several trials with non-beaktrimmed breeders and will explain the possibilities to prevent birds from starting the peck at each other. Furthermore she will give insights in what to do if the birds start pecking. What management tools are at hand.
Yousef Daoud
Yousef Daoud, product manager breeders at Roxell will explain how natural beak smoothing can safe feed consumption on the one hand and prevent mortality due to pecking on the other hand. With the ‘Natural Beak Smoothing concept’ the beak growth of broiler breeders will be controlled continuously while they are fed.
Fabian Brockotter
The webinar will be hosted by Fabian Brockotter, editor for Poultry World.
Join the experts, attendance is free
Webinar time
The webinar will be broadcast live from Amsterdam, the Netherlands June 29, 2017 at 15.30pm Central European Time. This corresponds with:
• 9.30am in Atlanta, GA;
• 16.30pm in Moscow, Russia;
• 14.30pm in London, UK;
• 20.30pm in Bangkok, Thailand;
• 21.30pm in Beijing, China;For anyone who is unable to follow the webinar, it will be available for streaming at any other date at a later moment.

HenHub newsletter

We are about to start distributing the HenHub newsletter. The plan is to send the newsletter with news items collected as published in posts on the HenHub on a monthly basis.

In addition to our collection of news items, the HenHub website contains information about the topics feather pecking and end-of-lay of laying hens.

HenHub is part of the Hennovation project, which has its own hennovelties newsletter.

You may submit potential news items for the HenHub newsletter to Marc . Bracke [At] wur.nl.

 

From beak to tail – Meeting announcement

From beak to tail – mechanisms underlying damaging behaviour in laying hens and pigs

First Announcement
ISAE 2017 Satellite Meeting
Monday 7th August 2017,
University of Aarhus, Denmark

A one-day meeting, organized jointly by the FareWellDock – Network and the GroupHouseNet COST-action aims to bring together researchers working within the field of damaging behaviour in both pigs and poultry. By joining efforts on an interspecies level, we have the opportunity to greatly enhance the understanding of the mechanisms underlying tail biting and feather pecking. Both behaviours are challenging, from an animal welfare and from an economic point-of-view, while in several countries, as well as at the EU level, the ethical justification of tail docking and beak trimming is currently being debated.

This full-day meeting will be held at the ISAE 2017 congress venue on August 7th, 2017, starting at 9am.

The meeting will focus on the following main themes:

– Mechanisms underlying the link between health and damaging behaviour

– Predisposing factors for damaging behaviour during early development

Both themes will be introduced by invited experts, followed by short research presentations by participants, and then elaborated on in inter-species discussion groups.

In addition, the program will include a networking session, with the aim to facilitate knowledge exchange and future cooperation between researchers working on damaging behaviour in pigs and poultry.

The registration for the meeting will open by the end of February 2017, and will be open until May 15th, 2017. The meeting participation is limited to 80 persons, so make sure to register in time!

For further information, please contact anna . valros [AT] helsinki . fi.

From Beat to Tail – Homepage

www.isae2017.com

Leaflet

 

Hennovelties newsletter

Hennovelties is the bi-annual newsletter of the Hennovation project. The Henhub website is part of this project. The Hennovelties newsletter will keep you up to date about project progress and results, upcoming events and links to other research and projects. Please contact Paula Baker at p.e.baker(at)bristol.ac.uk to subscribe to the newletter. You can view previous Hennovelties newletters here.

 

32nd Poultry Science Symposium UK

WSPA UK’s 32nd Poultry Science Symposium will take place on July 3 to 5, 2017 in Cambridge, UK. The theme is “Poultry feathers and skin – the past, present and future of poultry integument”.

The scientific committee has put together a program that will capture the aspects of biology, genetics, welfare, nutrition and other management aspects related to poultry feathers and skin looking both to the past and the future.

For more information see the website.

32nd Poultry Science Symposium